Frequently Asked Questions

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** Please note that this web page is always being updated with FAQ's! **

 

ADOPTION

WHAT DOES ADOPTION MEAN?

Adoption involves a bit more paperwork than simply purchasing a horse. You are required to submit an application to be approved as an adopter, and then must sign an adoption agreement outlining guidelines that you must follow when you bring your new Standardbred home. This includes the promise to provide proper care, as well as you are not allowed to privately rehome or sell your adopted horse.  Post-Adoption checkups are scheduled periodically to check in on the well being of your Standardbred, as well as making sure that you as the adopter are happy!

HOW CAN I BE APPROVED FOR ADOPTION?

There is an application that can be found by clicking the "Horses In Our Program" tab. It is a PDF document that you can download and fill out, then email back to us. Make sure to read the application thoroughly, as we cannot approve applications that are incomplete. You can also send property photos along with your application, it saves us time asking for them, and we can get you approved within 24 hours. If you are unable to provide facility photos, it can take up to 2 weeks to have a representative out to conduct a site visit. 

 

SHOULD I BE CONCERNED ABOUT THE POST-ADOPTION CHECKUPS?

Many people are worried about the site visits. If you are giving your adopted Standardbred the care that they require, that you are happy with how they are doing, and there are no behavioural issues; then our site visits are often "mini social visits". We have paperwork to fill out and we take photos of the horse; but the main reason for the checkups is to just ensure that a horse is doing okay, and that you as the adopter are happy as well. We want you to know that we are there if you have any questions, or concerns. Checkups are always scheduled, and if a Champion Representative shows up unannounced, then you should contact us immediately, as this is not protocol. The only time that an unannounced visit may happen is if an adopter is not responding to requests to book an appointment from their Champion Representative, and they do not answer follow ups from one of our Board Members. These visits will often be accompanied by a member of law enforcement or the Animal Welfare team. 

CAN I SET UP A TIME TO MEET SOME HORSES?

Our horses are located in different parts of Ontario at private foster farms, so you will have to book specific appointments to meet certain horses. We are unable to book an appointment until you have submitted an application and be pre-approved. This is simply to cut down on appointments being booked by those who would not be approved, or are simply not a good fit for the horses that they are meeting. It helps us to ensure that we are finding the absolute right homes for horses, and we don't get someone's hopes ups in case we review their application and feel they are not the right fit for a horse. 

WHAT TYPE OF HOME DO YOU LOOK AT?

We are not looking for the fanciest stables. We want people who care. Who can provide a safe living area for a horse, give them the necessities that they require, and will love them unconditionally. That is what we look for. So do not be afraid to apply if you think we will judge the facility you have, trust us - none of us have fancy stables either - but we make up for lacking the fancy by providing the love.

FOSTERING

WHAT IS FOSTERING?

Fostering is much like a free lease. You are not required to pay a lease fee to have a horse. However, you are expected to provide the basic necessities of care for that horse. All costs and who is responsible for those costs are discussed on an individual basis at the beginning of each fostering term. The more costs that a foster home covers, the larger the % of the adoption fee that we provide back to the foster home at the end of their fostering tenure for that horse.

HOW DOES FOSTERING WORK?

Fostering times can range from 30 days to up to 3-6 months depending on the horse you are fostering and their situation. Foster horses are always actively available for adoption, unless otherwise specified (due to training or health related reasons). You would be responsible for showing a horse to a potential adopter and reporting back to the organization if you feel it is a good fit – you know the horse best, as you see them every day! You get to help them find the special person that they will spend the rest of their lives with.

I NEED A COMPANION BECAUSE MY HORSE IS LONELY, CAN I FOSTER?

We do offer out fostering if you are in need of a companion due to the loss of an equine or you have another horse that is not doing well without a friend. However, with these horses, as you need them, would not be actively available for adoption – which means that you would be responsible for their full-time care costs. Once you are no longer in immediate need of having them as a companion, we would go back to our standard fostering arrangements until they found a permanent home.

DONATIONS

HOW CAN I DONATE?

Currently we accept e-transfer's to administration@newstartstandardbreds.com.

Please make your password "donation" unless you let us know it is a different password. 

We also accept PayPal donations at : newstartstandardbreds@gmail.com 

If you wish to send a cheque or provide a product/service donation - please email us or message our Facebook page!

WHAT WILL MY DONATION BE USED FOR?

All private donations will be split between our Compassionate Care fund and our Foster Care fund. If you would like your donation to go directly to a specific horse or fundraising operation; please let us know with the notes of your donation.

WHAT IS THE COMPASSIONATE CARE FUND AND HOW CAN MY DONATION HELP?

The Compassionate Care fund is to assist horses that have reached their life expectancy and require euthanasia. For one reason or another, their owner is unable or unwilling to provide them with end of life euthanasia. We do request that owners provide some level of responsibility, however our ultimate goal is to ensure that a horse has a peaceful ending, and does not end up on a slaughter house truck, or being left to pass naturally, when they likely will suffer first - due to health or mobility issues.